October Health Beat

“Karen’s Kolumn” is researched and written by Public Health Nurse Karen Dolley. We appreciate her support and willingness to share!

October is National Domestic Violence Awareness Month.

According to 2009 data from the Federal CDC, women experienced 4.8 million partner related physical assaults and rapes. Men were victims of 2.9 million partner related physical assaults. These numbers underestimate the problem as many victims don’t report this violence to family, friends, or law enforcement. Many victims think others will not believe them and that law enforcement can’t or won’t help. Domestic violence is the leading cause of injury to women and 50% of the homicides in Maine are related to domestic abuse. Domestic violence affects people of all races and at all socioeconomic levels.

Often domestic violence begins with emotional abuse and progresses to physical and/or sexual abuse. Frequently, several types of abuse occur together.

There are four major types of partner violence. Physical violence is when a person hurts or tries to hurt another person by hitting, kicking, or using any other type of physical force. Sexual violence is forcing a partner to engage in a sexual act without their consent. Threats include using words, weapons, or other means to communicate an intention to cause harm. Emotional abuse is threatening a partner, his or her possessions, pets, or family members or harming a partner’s sense of self worth. Examples include (more…)

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MSAD 68 Dictionary Day

Friday October 22nd will be a “big” day for third grade students from SeDoMoCha as they start their day by boarding a bus for a short field trip to the Valley Grange Hall in Guilford. While the primary purpose of the trip is to receive their own personal dictionaries, they’ll also learn  a bit about our agricultural history–including the Grange’s relationship to our mail system of R.F.D. (Rural Free Delivery).

Coming Soon!

The goal of the program is to assist third grade students to complete the school year as good writers, active readers and creative thinkers by providing them with their own personal dictionaries. The dictionaries are a gift to each student to use at school and home for years to come. This will be the Grange’s fourth year providing dictionaries to SeDoMoCha third graders.

Grange members planning to help with this exciting, fun-filled day should plan to be at the Grange Hall between 8:30 AM and 9:00 AM. Parents with home-schooled third graders are welcome to attend or to contact the school to receive a dictionary.

Meat or Heat Raffle Underway

The tickets for our meat or heat raffle are on sale now! This raffle will work just like it has in the past – tickets are $1 each and the lucky winner gets $100 in “meat or heat” (a check made out to the supplier of his or her choice).

This is an important fundraiser for us with proceeds going to help with our Words for Thirds Dictionary Program and other community service projects. Contact any Valley Grange member to purchase your tickets! The lucky winner will be drawn at our “Harvest Hootenanny” on November 19th.

MSAD 4 Dictionary Day

Thursday, October 21st  will be a “big” day for third grade students from PCES in Guilford. They will board a bus for a short field trip to the Valley Grange Hall. While the primary purpose of the trip is to receive their own personal dictionaries, they’ll also learn a bit about our agricultural history–including the Grange’s relationship to our mail system of R.F.D. (Rural Free Delivery). The goal of the program is to assist third grade students to complete the school year as good writers, active readers and creative thinkers by providing them with their own personal dictionaries. The dictionaries are a gift to each student to use at school and home for years to come. The Words for Thirds program has been providing Guilford Scholars with dictionaries since 2004. Grange members planning to help with this exciting, fun-filled day should plan to arrive at the Grange Hall no later than 12:30-12:45. Parents and home-schooled third graders are welcome to attend or to contact the school to receive a dictionary.

Grange Adopts Platoon

The Youth and Junior Departments of the Maine State Grange have adopted a platoon of approximately thirty soldiers stationed overseas… the responsibilities with this include writing each soldier letters and sending care packages once per month. They are asking for help from the Grange Family (or anyone!) with this and Valley Grange is participating. So members, man your pencils!

Specific information including a list of items needed is available for download by clicking the link in the right-hand column. Our community service chairperson Mary Annis will be handling things locally or you can address specific questions to Sue Hacket (State Youth/Junior Director) at 666-8849 or by email to jennsue@suscom-maine.net. What a great opportunity!

September Highlights

Bring your calendars, enthusiasm and ideas to our Planning Roundtable on Friday, September 17th! We’ll be discussing our programs and projects for the year… As always, potluck supper at 6 PM will be followed by the meeting at 7 PM. Members, “almost members,” and folks interested in helping our communities are welcome!

While you’re at the meeting you’ll have a chance to pick up your Meat or Heat Raffle tickets. Tickets are a measly $1 each with a potential $100 return on investment! The winner of our raffle gets a $100 check made out to the “meat or heat” provider of his or her choice. We’re also looking for some folks to help with ticket sales… the winner will be drawn at our November meeting (Friday, 19th) and need not be present to win!

Coming Soon!

We’re gearing up for our Words for Thirds program… chances are there’s a dictionary day coming soon to a school district near you! Valley Grange will continue to provide dictionaries to MSAD 4, 68, and 41. Garland Grange has commited to providing dictionaries to students in MSAD46–including any fourth graders who were missed last year!

Parents are reminded… if you are homeschooling or you and your child joined the district after Dictionary Day (usually in October or November) we want him or her to have a dictionary! Contact your school or Walter Boomsma  if you are in MSAD 4, 68, or 41 or Andrea Rollins  of Garland Grange if you are in MSAD 46.

Agriculture in and out of the Classroom

Food checkout day: It takes about 40 days for most Americans to earn enough disposable income to pay for their food for the entire year. In 2007, Food Checkout Day was February 6th. Since 1930, the number of days required to earn enough income to pay for food has decreased.

compared to

Tax Freedom Day: It takes the average American more than 100 days to earn enough income to pay all taxes each year. In 2007, Tax Freedom Day was April 11th. Since 1930, the number of days required has increased.

Perhaps even more interesting… in 1940 the average farm fed 19 people. In 2004 the average farm fed 144 people! Sounds like farmers know what they are doing!

This information came from “Change From A Dollar” a resource book published for teachers by the Illinois Agriculture in the Classroom website. You can download this book for free even if you’re not a teacher. (Homeschoolers might want to take special note here!)

Speaking of Agriculture in the Classroom, this might be a good time to note that Ag Week is March 14 – 18 next year.  Read ME during Ag Week is a great opportunity to work with your local school… check out the MAITC website and watch for more information here about how it will be handled in Piscataquis County. When you check out the website you’ll find information on some other good projects… and some potential grants for agricultural projects in the classroom.

September Health Beat

“Karen’s Kolumn” is researched and written by Public Health Nurse Karen Dolley. We appreciate her support and willingness to share!

September is Fruits and Veggies-More Matters Month!

The Centers for Disease Control join other public and private organizations this month to promote eating fruits and vegetables for better health. The vast majority of Americans do not get their recommended intake of fruits and vegetables. Consumption of less healthy foods and beverages like soda and fatty fast foods is replacing healthier foods such as fruits and vegetables, especially among young people. French fries account for about one third of vegetable servings among children ages 2-19 years old!

A wide variety of fruits and vegetables provides your body with vitamins, minerals, and fiber. People who eat more fruits and vegetables are more likely to have a reduced risk for many chronic diseases including stroke, heart disease, diabetes, and certain cancers. Intake of some high fiber fruits and vegetables is associated with lower blood glucose and lower blood lipid levels. Most fruits and vegetables are low in calories and low in fat. Substituting fruits and vegetables for higher calorie foods can be part of a weight loss program. Fruits and vegetables are a natural source of energy. Diets rich in potassium from beet greens, sweet potatoes, and white potatoes may help to maintain a healthy blood pressure. Diets rich in Vitamin A from carrots, spinach, and winter squash help keep eyes and skin healthy and help to protect against infections. Diets rich in Vitamin C from peppers, kiwi, strawberries, oranges, and broccoli help heal wounds and keep teeth and gums healthy. Adequate Folate from spinach and asparagus may reduce a woman’s risk of having a child with a brain or spinal cord defect.

All fresh, frozen, dried, or canned fruits and vegetables count toward a fruit and vegetable goal. Look for fruit without added sugar or syrups and vegetables without added salt, butter, or cream sauces.

At http://www.fruitsandveggiesmatter.gov you can find more information about the benefits of fruits and vegetables, how many servings of fruits and vegetables you need, recipes, and tips for adding more fruits and vegetables to your diet. As summer comes to an end and fall begins, visit your local farm stand for a wide variety of fruits and vegetables. And ENJOY!